Items 11 to 14 of 14 total

Plaza oil paint labels

There are many technical terms used to describe the properties of paint. A little chemistry know-how can help you become a better painter—but don’t worry—we’re not talking about balancing chemical equations or memorizing the periodic table here! This ongoing series of mini-articles will help you get to know your medium on a deeper level. Paint Talk: Part I is about Lightfastness.

How to Interpret Artists’ Quality Paint Labels

Have you ever wondered what all the symbols and numbers on your paint tubes mean? Reading your paint labels can be like reading a nutrition label on a food package—there’s a lot of information there, but what to make of it? Many of the numbers on your paint tubes represent standardized information about the paint's chemical properties. For example, if you're trying to match a particular color across brands, and each company uses a different proprietary color name, you can match the same color index number between brands. If you're looking at Studio or Craft paint, you might not be so lucky—only the highest quality paints list all of the paints' attributes. Information can vary from brand to brand, but most labels displayed on artists’ quality paint reveal the fo...

Read More
Comments | Posted in: Product Guide By K. McDermott

Paint Talk, Part I: Lightfastness

Sep 23, 2015 1:48:43 PM

Colorful paints

There are many technical terms used to describe the properties of paint. A little chemistry know-how can help you become a better painter, but don’t worry—we’re not talking about balancing chemical equations or memorizing the periodic table here! This ongoing series of mini-articles will help you get to know your medium on a deeper level.

What is Lightfastness?

Have you ever left construction paper near a sunny window and found that the color became faded in months or even weeks? Maybe you’ve left a plastic item in your yard, or a magazine in your car and later found it bleached by the sun.

Pigments, paper, plastic toys, fabric, paint and other items react to sunlight in different ways. Materials that maintain their colors over time are “lightfast” and lightfastness can be important when purchasing art supplies.

Some pigments and paints are described as being lightfast because these products are resistant to fading from light exposure. Art products that have a lightfastness rating of “A” are super resistant to fading from light exposure and will not incur color change or fading for up to 100 years when stored in museum conditions. Of course, paintings should never be stored in direc...

Read More
Comments | Posted in: Product Guide By K. McDermott

Paint Tubes

Whether you’re painting with oil or acrylic, it can be hard to decide which paints to use for a project. Not only are there many variations of each color, there are different series of paints with significant differences in price range. This quick guide explains the differences between three grades of paint.

First, it helps to understand what paint is. Paint is pigment suspended in a liquid substance called binder. Binder is a vehicle for the pigment and can be made of different substances. The binder in most oil paint is linseed oil; the vehicle for watercolors is, of course, water. Acrylics are sometimes referred to as “water-based” because they are held together by an emulsion of water and plastic binders called polymers. Unlike oil paint, any water-based paint can be thinned or diluted with water.

There are more binders and fillers in craft and studio paints, so these paints tend to have greater color shift and less opacity. Color shift means the color of the paint is more easily diluted and altered when two or more colors are mixed together. There is less color shift when mixing artist quality paints together.

Craft Paint

The thin consistency of craft paint makes it versatile for ...

Read More
Comments | Posted in: Product Guide By K. McDermott

Brent Leopold - Mail Art in a Field in PA

Brent Leopold loves the United States Postal Service. He says he has sent his artwork to every US state and even around the world as part of his “Human Artist Vending Machine” project, which he records in photos on his Flickr account, along with other painting and drawing projects he’s working on. Brent participates in mail art with friends and strangers “as a way to connect art world-wide, trade with other artists, and do something with [his] doodles and studies.” His art has appeared in three Greek newspapers and some of it resides in the Coke Company Headquarters after one mailing experiment. Brent says he has “mailed art to one random business in every US State. Just to see what happens.” 

It’s almost shocking that mail art is a still a thing in 2015—especially with the US Postal Service supposedly on its dying vestiges in the digital age. There is a collective called the International Union of Mail Artists, formed August 16, 1988. Their website was established in 2008 and is still quite active. Post Secret is probably the most well-known community mail art project in the United States, established by Frank Warren in 2005. Anyone can mail a secret, written or illustrated on a po...

Read More
Comments | Posted in: Artist Spotlight By K. McDermott
Items 11 to 14 of 14 total